Traditional family values and substance abuse
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Traditional family values and substance abuse

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Published by Kluwer Academic / Plenum Publishers in New York .
Written in English

Subjects:

  • Puerto Ricans -- Drug use -- United States,
  • Puerto Ricans -- Alcohol use -- United States,
  • Puerto Ricans -- United States -- Attitudes,
  • Alcoholism -- United States -- Public opinion,
  • Puerto Rican families -- United States,
  • Public opinion -- United States

Book details:

Edition Notes

Includes bibliographical references (p. 193-207) and index

Statementedited by Mary Cuadrado and Louis Lieberman
SeriesThe Plenum series in culture and health
ContributionsCuadrado, Mary, Lieberman, Louis
Classifications
LC ClassificationsHV5824.E85 T73 2002
The Physical Object
Paginationxi, 220 p.
Number of Pages220
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL17054288M
ISBN 100306466198
LC Control Number2001038595

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Traditional Family Values and Substance Abuse: The Hispanic Contribution to an Alternative Prevention and Treatment Approach (The Plenum Series in Culture and Health): Medicine & Health Science Books @ hor: Mary Cuadrado, Louis Lieberman. Based on findings from a sample of nearly 1, Puerto Ricans living in the New York area, this book posits that adhering to traditional cultural values (for example, the family) has the socially desirable consequence of discouraging such deviant behaviors as substance abuse. The authors conclude.   Read "Traditional Family Values and Substance Abuse The Hispanic Contribution to an Alternative Prevention and Treatment Approach" by Mary Cuadrado available from Rakuten Kobo. Based on findings from a sample of nearly 1, Puerto Ricans living in the New York area, this book posits that adherin Brand: Springer US. Get this from a library! Traditional family values and substance abuse: the Hispanic contribution to an alternative prevention and treatment approach. [Mary Cuadrado; Louis Lieberman] -- Based on findings from a sample of nearly 1, Puerto Ricans living in the New York area, this book posits that adhering to traditional cultural values (for example, the family) has the socially.

The authors think the relationships between tradition, family, and values have general common threads running through all societies, but need to be understood separately for each group. The final aim is to have an empirical base for a culturally appropriate use of ethnotherapy in persons with drug or alcohol problems. Traditional family values and substance abuse. New York: Kluwer Academic / Plenum Publishers, [] (OCoLC) Material Type: Internet resource: Document Type: Book, Internet Resource: All Authors / Contributors: Mary Cuadrado; Louis Lieberman. Cite this chapter as: Cuadrado M., Lieberman L. () Traditional Family Values. In: Traditional Family Values and Substance Abuse. The Plenum Series in Culture and Health. "Church, Drugs, and Drug Addiction" should be available in English early next year. The manual begins with an overview of John Paul II's teaching on drug use. The Pope points out that drugs are one of the main threats facing young people, including children. The document identifies many causes behind drug .

Traditional family values and substance abuse: M Cuadrado, L Lieberman. Kluwer Academic Press, Article in Journal of Epidemiology & Community Health 56(12) . Introduction to the Family Disease As a Family Disease, the Family becomes disconnected. The once vibrant, healthy, working system, falls into crisis and chaos. As the chemical dependency progresses, so does the family disease. The symptoms of the Family Disease progress as the Family attempts to find ways to survive within the problem. Articles from Journal of Epidemiology and Community Health are provided here courtesy of BMJ Group. Native American elders believe that many substance abuse problems are related to the loss of traditional culture. Higher rates of substance use have been found in persons who closely identify with non-Native American values and the lowest rates are found in bicultural individuals who are comfortable with both sets of cultural values.